Variation in the Rhombic Egg Eater (Dasypeltis scabra)

 

Variation in the Rhombic Skaapsteker (Psammophylax rhombeatus rhombeatus)

 

Variation in the Rhombic Night Adder (Causus rhombeatus)

 

Variation in the Herald Snake (Crotaphopeltis hotamboeia)

 

Variation in the Brown House Snake (Boaedon capensis)

 

Variation in the Horned Adder (Bitis caudalis)

 

Common Green Snakes Of South Africa.

Head Shots

Common Green Snakes Of South Africa.

Full Body

Harmless Green Snakes Of South Africa.Version 2

 

Rhombic Night Adder versus Puff Adder.

The key difference between the two species easily identifiable close-ups and full body image.
The Night Adder has small scales and round pupils. Noticeable it has  V-shaped marking on it’s head.
The Puff Adder has keeled (rough scales) and vertical pupils.

Rhombic Night Adder versus Rhombic Egg Eater.

Night Adder (VENOMOUS) mostly active during the day, is a short robust snake with a noticeable it has V-shaped marking on its head. With distinct black chevrons or blotches down the back with smooth scales and round pupils.

For more reference photos:
www.tyroneping.co.za/snakes-southern-africa/causus-rhombeatus/

Rhombic Egg Eater (NON-VENOMOUS) mostly active at night, is a slender snake with a vague V-shaped marking behind the head. With distinct black (sometimes rust or red) irregular blotches or markings down the back with keeled scales and vertical pupils.

For more reference photos:
www.tyroneping.co.za/snakes-southern-africa/dasypeltis-scabra/

 

Stiletto Snake versus Wolf Snake.

The key difference between the two species easily identifiable from a close up and full body image.
The Stiletto snake will arch it’s neck in defense when harassed, this snake is one of the few that cannot be safely held behind the head.
The Wolf snake is a small inoffensive snake which moves in short erratic bursts when harassed, mimicking the stiletto snakes movements,

Thread Snake, Blind Snake, Mole Snake or Stiletto Snake.

With summer rains on the way you can expect more and more snake encounters – here is one snake you want to avoid the Stiletto Snake!
Found a small dark snake, Is it a harmless Mole snake? Probably not!

There is a common misconception that young Mole snakes are small dark coloured snakes (although as they grow usually around 1m in length they are a uniform brown, jet black, light orange or even a dusty salmon colour depending on where in South Africa they are found). that are found underground and often come to the surface after heavy rains, entering homes and often found drowned in swimming pools. This couldn’t be further from the truth, as seen in teh comparison below Juvenile Mole Snakes are typically highly patterned snakes with prominent bright coloured eyes which are clearly visible.

The Thread Snakes and Bibrons blind snakes could resemble the venomous Stiletto Snake but when viewed side by side it’s clearly shown they have distinctive differences. The Stiletto snake has a sharped pointed head whilst both the Thread Snake and Bibrons Blind snake lack a clearly formed distinct head.

Still not sure? Have a look at these links below to reference if the snake you’ve found is actually a harmless Mole Snake, Thread snake, Blind snake
or the venomous Stiletto Snake:

Thread Snakes (Leptotyphlops species) www.tyroneping.co.za/snakes-south…/leptotyphlops-scutifrons/

Bibrons Blind Snake (Afrotyphlops bibronii) www.tyroneping.co.za/snakes-southern…/afrotyphlops-bibronii/

Mole Snake – Juvenile (Pseudaspis cana) www.tyroneping.co.za/snakes-southern-africa/pseudaspis-cana/

Stiletto Snake (Atractaspis bibronii) www.tyroneping.co.za/snakes-southern-…/atractaspis-bibronii/

Green Mamba versus Spotted Bush Snake

The key difference between the two species easily identifiable from a close up and full body image.
Green Mamba’s are only found in Kwa-Zulu Natal and just into the Eastern Cape.

There are NO Green Mamba’s in the Western Cape, Northern Cape, Limpopo, North West, Mpumalanga, Free State or Gauteng

Boomslang (Cape) versus Spotted Bush Snake

The key difference between the two species easily identifiable from a close up and full body image.
Boomslang are found throughout the country, these individuals show typical colouration from the Eastern and Western Cape which differ from those found in the Eastern part of South Africa.

 

Boomslang versus Spotted Bush Snake

The key difference between the two species easily identifiable from a close up and full body image.
Boomslang are found throughout the country, but individuals from the Eastern and Western Cape differ from those found in the Eastern part of South Africa.

 

Common Purple Gloss Snake versus  Cape Wolf Snake.

Dark snakes often prove to be difficult for people to distinguish between.
A side by side comparison illustrates the key differences between the two species.

Slug Eater versus Legless Skink.

Two extremely common species, found in the Eastern and Western Cape.
These two species are often confused and the Legless Skink is often killed when people think it’s indeed a snake.
The key differences can be seen as the Legless skink actually has eyelids and can be seen in these images has almost the
appearance of a “beak”  which makes it remarkably different from a snake.

Coral Snake versus Spotted Harliquin Snake

The key difference between the two species easily identifiable from a close up and full body image.
The Coral snake inhabits the drier sandy regions in the Eastern, Western and Northern Cape primarily.
When threatened it will raise up and spread a narrow hood like a cobra.

The Spotted Harlequin snake is slender and usually reluctate to bite, they do not raise up or spread a narrow hood.
These two snakes are often confused by the general public in and around the Karoo where these snakes are commonly encountered.

 

Variation among Herald Snakes from across South Africa

Showing the varying degree’s of upper lip colours from specimens in different habitats even within the same general area.

Variation among Herald Snakes from across South Africa

Showing the varying degree’s of upper lip colours from specimens in different habitats even within the same general area.

BRADYPODION OF THE  CENTRAL KWA – ZULU NATAL INTERIOR

There is apparent confusion in being able to differentiate between these three closely related species, visually this chart serves to distinguish the tangible differences.
Bradypodion dracomontanum – Drakensberg Dwarf Chameleon
Bradypodion sp. – “Emerald” Dwarf Chameleon
Bradypodion thamnobates – Natal Midlands Dwarf Chameleon

EASY CONFUSED TOADS

Two Toad Species often confused.

The Guttural Toad and Raucous Toad both very common species and often occurring in the same habitat. Can often be seen on the roads after rain, in cool or warm weather.

EASY CONFUSED TOADS

Two Toad Species often confused.

The Karoo Toad and Raucous Toad both very common species and often occurring in the same habitat. Can often be seen on the roads after rain, in cool or warm weather.

EASY CONFUSED TOADS

Two Toad Species often confused.

The Guttural Toad and Raucous Toad both very common species and often occurring in the same habitat. Can often be seen on the roads after rain, in cool or warm weather.